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SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA AND ARIZONA REPORTING WIDESPREAD WEST NILE VIRUS INFECTED MOSQUITO SAMPLES CAUSING REGIONAL CONCERN

Mosquitoes test positive for West Nile Virus for the first time this year in La Quinta.

Post Date:06/12/2019 5:04 PM

 

PRESS RELEASE 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: CONTACT: 

June 12, 2019 Tammy Gordon 

Public Information Officer 

(760) 342-8287 or (760) 296-2905 

tgordon@cvmvcd.org 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA AND ARIZONA REPORTING WIDESPREAD WEST NILE VIRUS INFECTED MOSQUITO SAMPLES CAUSING REGIONAL CONCERN 

Mosquitoes test positive for West Nile Virus for the first time this year in La Quinta. 

INDIO, CA, JUNE 12, 2019: Twenty-nine more samples of mosquitoes collected from District traps have tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV) in the last week. This brings the total WNV positive samples to 108 for 2019. One sample came from a trap in La Quinta near Airport Boulevard and Madison Street. This is the first sample of mosquitoes to test positive for the virus in La Quinta this year. At this time last year, no virus activity had been detected anywhere in the Coachella Valley. 

While there have been no reports of people infected with WNV in the state of California, three people in Arizona have been reported positive for the virus as of June 11. The number of WNV-infected mosquito samples being reported in California (84) and Maricopa County in Arizona (193) are making this a region-wide concern. 

WNV is a potentially serious illness. It is transmitted to people by the bite of an infected mosquito. Since there is currently no cure for WNV, it is important to recognize that although most infected people will have no symptoms, others develop fever, headaches, and body aches; hospitalization is required in some cases, and in rare cases the disease is fatal. Preventing mosquito bites is the best defense against WNV. 

District staff will post disease notification signs in communities located near the trap locations where virus activity was detected and will intensify surveillance and inspections for standing water sources where mosquitoes lay eggs. In addition to the infected mosquito sample from La Quinta, there were 28 samples that tested positive from other areas of the valley including Coachella, Indio, Mecca, and Thermal. See the table for details. 

 Screen Shot 2019-06-12 at 4.59.49 PM

District staff will carry out larval and adult mosquito control as necessary in an effort to reduce the number of mosquitoes and interrupt further transmission of the virus. Please see the District website for control activities: http://www.cvmvcd.org/controlactivities.htm 

Young children, people over 50 years old, and individuals with lowered immune systems are at greater risk of experiencing more severe symptoms when infected. Anyone with symptoms should contact their health care provider. 

Prevent mosquito bites:

 Avoid going outside in the hours around dawn and dusk when mosquitoes that can transmit West Nile virus are most active. 

 Wear EPA registered ingredients such as DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or IR3535 to exposed skin and/or clothing (as directed on the product label). 

 Wear long sleeve shirts, long pants, socks and shoes when mosquitoes are most active. 

 Be sure window and door screens are in good repair to prevent mosquitoes from entering your home. 

Prevent mosquitoes around your home: 

 Inspect yards for standing water sources and drain water that may have collected under potted plants, in bird baths, discarded tires, and any other items that could collect water. 

 Check your rain gutters and lawn drains to make sure they aren’t holding water and debris. 

 Clean and scrub bird baths and pet watering dishes weekly. 

 Check and clean any new potted plant containers that you bring home because they may have eggs. Some mosquito eggs can remain viable in dry areas for months. 

Please contact the District at (760) 342-8287 to report mosquito problems, request mosquitofish, and report neglected pools or standing water where mosquitoes breed. Dead birds should be reported to the California Department of Public Health at (877) 968-2473 or online at http://westnile.ca.gov/report_wnv.php. Visit us online at www.cvmvcd.org to obtain more information and submit service requests. For the latest statewide statistics for WNV activity, please visit http://westnile.ca.gov